Idea Translation Lab 2012

 

ABOUT SELECTED PROJECT VIDEOS

The following videos are taken from the final CLASS OF 2012 presentations, which took place at the Science Gallery, 4 April, 2012. The projects selected focus on how we can hack and modify food, transport and energy systems at a local, urban level.
 

 

Radical Growth

Land and garden share service for rethinking food production and skill sharing in the city

Team: Clara Kennedy, Daithi O’Reilly, Elaine Kavanagh, Eoin Connolly, Monika Myszor, Minah Nguyen, Sean Flynn

 

 

 

Dublin Bike App

Data visualisation for improvising Dublin Bike services, feedback and improvements

Team: Catherine Bergin, Cian Duggan, Mary Finch, Alan Hopkins, David Jebb, Holly Yort

 

 

 

Pedal Power

Sustainable bike power stations for charging mobile and other electronic devices

Team: Claire Curran, Damien Lee, Sean Cahill & Susannah Keller Finn 

 

 

TEAM PROJECTS

 

Dublin Bike App

Data visualisation for improvising Dublin Bike services, feedback and improvements

Team: Catherine Bergin, Cian Duggan, Mary Finch, Alan Hopkins, David Jebb, Holly Yort

HACK-THE-CITY is about changing the way that people interact with the city, using innovations such as new technologies and ways of relating people to the environment around them. It can involve anything from changing the way people think about public spaces (like fencing it off, making public spaces private) to using feedback from the masses to create new paths through the city. Along this vein, we decided to help change the way that people view public transportation. Instead of merely using buses or taxis, we decided to help facilitate the use of the DublinBike system. This allows for an interactive mode of public transport, allowing people and the city to benefit in a symbiotic relationship. The people receive transportation, exercise, fitness, and an easy public transit system. The city receives a healthier group of citizens, less pollution, and decreased traffic.

Dublin Bike App is aimed at existing DublinBikes users. Although Dublin Bikes has been a very popular service the information about the location and availability of the bikes is currently protected and locked. Our project proposes how in unlocking this data we could provide a better service for people and improve the overall transport flow within the city. The key features of our app would include:
 

  • Mapping of bike locations
  • Route planning and crowd source function
  • Log in access for DB user accounts
  • Allow users to reserve bikes via the app (new unique selling point, result of user interview)
  • Provide support on both Android and Iphone platform if possible

This project is important because it will help change the way people think about public transportation, taking it from an assumed provision of the government for the citizens and making it interactive, dependent on feedback and the public’s commitment to using it. It is a system that is not static, but can grow and change dependent on crowd feedback, which can help change the way that people interact with the government and think about public provision of goods and services. With our app, we thus hope to increase use of the mutually beneficial DublinBikes system, provide a feedback mechanism from the users to the city, and make the system flexible and able to grow and change.

 

Reach Out

Appropriating Dublin Bus electronic dashboards for communicating and raising awareness about homeless

Team: Nicola Duffy, Aifric Lennon, Sean Finley

We are increasingly living in a digital world. For the majority of us unimaginable volumes of data and information are available instantly literally at the touch of a button, through our personal computers, laptops, and mobile phones, completely changing the way we lead our lives and improving our ability to communicate, socialise, and work. Yet while this revolution is taking place all around us, whole segments of society are being left out due to poverty and deprivation. The city of Dublin, our city, is for everyone, not merely the better off and we feel that a project such as HACK-THE-CITY is an opportunity to reach out and try to help those less fortunate, and bring their plight to the awareness of the public. Our proposal for this project is to take a new piece of technology which has been deployed on our streets, the electronic display screens which display bus timetable information, and use it to provide information about services for the homeless in the city, as well as raising awareness of the issue.

 

Pedal Power

Sustainable bike power stations for charging mobile and other electronic devices

Team: Claire Curran, Damien Lee, Sean Cahill & Susannah Keller Finn

Have you ever been stuck in the city, unable to charge your phone but knew you had that important message coming in? This proposal aims to create a fun solution to this problem. Creating a series of bike booths (similar to phone booths) across the city. People will be able to go to the bike booth and charge their phone. Each bike booth comprises of a stationary bike, with a dynamo, attached to a battery pack and associated outlets for connecting your phone or usb device.  Sitting on the stationary bike you use pedal power to charge your device, while simultaneously improving your health and having fun. The benefits of this approach are 1) Safe charging of your device; 2) Immediate access points across the city for charging; 3) Fun and motivational way to keep healthy; 4) Immediate feedback on your input, including watts generated and calories burnt; 5) Creation of sustainable energy forms. This project will be developed as part of our broad curriculum course and will form of the experiments as part of the HACK-THE-CITY 2012 programme.

 

SoleMates:

Recyclable flat shoes for ladies on a night out
Team 1: Glyn Williams, Adele Morrin, Rachel King, Jenny Hurley, Rebecca Reilly & Fatemah Razmara                     

Team 2: Anne Quinlan, Colleen Murphy, Maggie Eabhroid, Kate O’Byrne , Lucy O'Donoghue & David Keegan

In relation to the theme of HACK-THE-CITY, we are, essentially hacking the social scene of contemporary Dublin and other western cities. Dublin is famous worldwide for its vibrant nightlife and lively pub scene; and every night women put on their party dresses and four inch stilettos and hit the dance floor. However our love affair with high-heels ends in divorce when at three in the morning our feet cry out in protest. Our love can be rekindled simply and sweetly by adorning Sole Mates; the compactable, flat disposable shoe made from recyclable and biodegradable materials. Good for the environment, your wallet and your feet, Sole Mates can be easily purchased from vending machines and cloak rooms in clubs, pubs and bars around the city. Sole Mates have a unique pivot joint which forms a central aspect of their simple, fashionable design. Made from all-recyclable materials including natural latex and organic cotton, they can be slipped into the smallest of clutches and used when the pain of heels becomes too much at the end of the party. Retailing for a couple of Euros  - be specific say between €3-5, your bank account will fall in love with your Sole Mates too. Your Sole Mates could save you from extortionate taxi fares and because of their eco-friendly nature; they can be thrown out at the end of night guilt free. Sole Mates heavenly work doesn’t finish there, as a portion of all proceeds made goes towards a Dublin based charity which seeks to help protect the environment.

 

Future Fat Fighters
Health animation for the prevention of obesity in 2050
Team: Tomas Vitkus, Sean-Tee Lim, Dave Reynolds, Alex Kennny & David Doyle      

At present, Ireland has one of the highest rates of childhood obesity in the world. One in ten children in Ireland aged 5-12 years are obese and it is a leading risk factor of the development of heart disease and cancer in later life. According to the UK Department of Health, by 2050, 60% of males and 50% of females will be obese following current international trends. There is an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure. Modern lifestyles contain cheap sources of calorie laden foodstuffs and our daily energy expenditure is constantly being reduced due to new time/effort saving technologies. Intervention, prevention and behavioural change are all required to develop any sort of sustainable response.

As a group, our main interests lie within the science/health sector. During the course of the Ideas Translation Lab (ITL) project, we observed how health information can be presented. Currently, health promotion in Ireland is carried out via mundane TV commercials or pamphlets that can be read in the doctor’s surgery. So we decided that our project would address this by creating a quick-sketch animation clip that could be used either as a viral campaign through the likes of YouTube/Vimeo, or as a demonstration to policy-makers, demanding them to implement change through a more innovative medium.

Future Fight Fighters animation
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yIzzKbCk2xg&feature=youtu.be

 

Radical Growth

Land and garden share service for rethinking food production and skill sharing in the city

Team: Clara Kennedy, Daithi O’Reilly, Elaine Kavanagh, Eoin Connolly, Monika Myszor, Minah Nguyen, Sean Flynn

Radical Growth is a peer-to-peer collaborative consumption project made operational via an online facility, which will unite those seeking access to land for cultivation with owners willing to grant access to their  garden/field/roof for this purpose.  Our aim is to address the issue of food security by enabling the people of Dublin to create a sustainable means of growing fresh produce.  The end result is an edible crop production to be shared by both owner and grower.

Radical Growth is therefore a pre-emptive action in the context of food security, which seeks to ‘hack’ urban dweller’s mentalities.  By facilitating autonomous ad-hoc organisation we will enable the people of Dublin to create a sustainable means for growing fresh food.  Radical Growth is an opportunity for users to take control of a basic aspect of their lives at a time when many feel vulnerable to market changes and austerity measures.  Addressing food security issues through this simple activity helps to counter associated crises, reduce dependence on imported goods and fossil fuels as well as tackling biodiversity loss.  The Radical Growth website will aid accessing of land for cultivation as well as act as a resource for those with a garden they wish to see cultivated but may be too busy, elderly or unskilled to make it work for them.  

 

GET THE RIDE

Lift sharing service for university students

Team: Rachel Brody, George Tetley, Ronan corrigan, Sean Down, Mark Dunne & Niall Collins

GET THE RIDE attempts to put in place a program whereby people (initially students and staff in Trinity College) can easily organise their own car-pooling service across Ireland. The reason for developing this service are two fold. Firstly, the scheme is a response to the environmental degradation brought about in part by peoples travelling habits. GET THE RIDE aims to address this degradation by bringing down the number of vehicles on Ireland’s roads, primarily in the course of long distance, inter-county journeys. Secondly, the operation is intended as a response to the price of travelling around the country. Fuel prices are too expensive for many, and even the quite reasonable rates of Bus Eireann can be costly for a student who needs to use the service often. It is also thought that the journey in a car with a fellow student will be more stimulating and pleasant than travelling with a coach operator.

This scheme will almost certainly allow people who live close by each other to organise car-pooling as they commute to Trinity for work or studies, bringing down the number of passengers and vehicles on the roads of Dublin every day. It is felt that a university is the best possible place to trial the operation for several reasons:

1.     There is a ready pool of people who require cheap travel across the country
2.     Students tend to have limited funds so car-pooling maximises the use of existing resources
3.     Staff and students may be more aware of the economic and environmental impacts of the number of vehicles in use in the country and likely to look for alternatives

Currently there is no equivalent to get the ride in Ireland at the moment. The only car-pooling which occurs is informal and at the level of . GET THE RIDE is very much within the spirit of HACK-THE-CITY as it will allow people to circumvent their reliance upon public transport, which should both impact positively upon their finances as well as galvanise people to search out novel ways of circumventing the dependence upon State and other-controlled resource’s.

 

CREDITS & THANKS:

 

The Idea Translation Lab is an annual Broad Curriculum course for Trinity College Dublin undergraduate students working with students from NCAD (National College of Art and Design). Developed as part of Science Gallery’s, EC FP7 project, Studiolab, the course is linked to the ArtScience Prize and programmes developed by Prof David Edwards at Harvard University and Le Laboratoire, Paris.

 

Course Director: Michael John Gorman

Course Coordinator & Tutor: Teresa Dillon

Course Administrator: Jane Chadwick

Invited lecturers: Owen O’Doherty, City Architect, Dublin City Council & Dominic Byrne, Fingal Co Co; DesignGoat, Product Design; Sean Harrington, Architect & Brian Solon, Interaction Design; PJ King entrepreneur and innovator; Dan Crowley, NDRC, Director of Commercial Development National Digital Research Centre; artists Seamus Nolan & Conor McGarrigle; Joan Mulvhill, IIA & Sean Coughlan and, Social Enterprise IRL

External Mentor: Jane Chadwick