DYNAMIC DUBLIN

CSAS (IE) — Barry Murphy, Steven Tobin, Thomas Cathcart, Michael Sexton

EXHIBIT

FRI 22.06.12 - SAT 08.09.12

Dublin Bikes is a public bicycle program that allows users to 
collect and return bikes from any one of the 44 stations around 
the city for a nominal fee. Since its inception in 2009, it has 
become one of the most popular schemes of its kind worldwide.
The website dublinbikes.ie shows real-time information for each 
station, including the number of available bikes. However, in 
order to see how bikes move across the city over time, a more 
detailed map is required. Using ‘heat maps’, the number of bikes 
at each station is represented by its temperature at that point, 
and the activity at that station by the size of its ‘hotspot’.
Combining this technique with interactive controls, the goal is to 
show how the bikes flow over time. The installation will include a large 
display screen, allowing the user to scroll forward or backward and 
see how the traffic of bikes flows through the city during the day.
Having observed the traffic patterns in data visualisation, the 
participant can suggest new locations for Dublin Bikes stations. 
The data received will be made available for future service planning.   
BIO: CSAS is a group of like-minded Irish PhD students from the 
School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin. They work in fields as 
diverse as experimental nanoscience, the physics of bubbles and 
foams, and the computer simulation of the fundamental building 
blocks of nature. The group helped setup and run the very successful 
BUBBLE exhibition in Science Gallery in 2009. The aim of CSAS is 
to develop new and engaging ways to represent complex data.

Dublin Bikes is a public bicycle program that allows users to collect and return bikes from any one of the 44 stations around the city for a nominal fee. Since its inception in 2009, it has become one of the most popular schemes of its kind worldwide.

The website dublinbikes.ie shows real-time information for each station, including the number of available bikes. However, in order to see how bikes move across the city over time, a more detailed map is required. Using ‘heat maps’, the number of bikes at each station is represented by its temperature at that point, and the activity at that station by the size of its ‘hotspot’.

Combining this technique with interactive controls, the goal is to show how the bikes flow over time. The installation will include a large display screen, allowing the user to scroll forward or backward and see how the traffic of bikes flows through the city during the day.

Having observed the traffic patterns in data visualisation, the participant can suggest new locations for Dublin Bikes stations. The data received will be made available for future service planning.

BIO: CSAS is a group of like-minded Irish PhD students from the School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin. They work in fields as diverse as experimental nanoscience, the physics of bubbles and foams, and the computer simulation of the fundamental building blocks of nature. The group helped setup and run the very successful BUBBLE exhibition in Science Gallery in 2009. The aim of CSAS is to develop new and engaging ways to represent complex data.

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DYNAMIC DUBLIN